1

Let’s Build a Zoo!

I can’t quite believe I have now been travelling around Australia in a little van for nearly a whole year! We have travelled the length of the East Coast and have made some unforgettable memories! But as you can see, I haven’t exactly been neck deep in environmental education. Teaching it that is, as I can safely say I have learnt a great deal on my journey from zoos, trips and lots of fascinating people.

This is why I decided to dedicate the last 4 months of our first year in Australia to continue in teaching and trying to be a part of the animal education industry. After lots of enquiring, emailing applying and not much luck, I got my first job in Australia! I was now a kids club attendant at Sea World Resort, Gold Coast. No it wasn’t actually teaching environmental education, but it was a foot in the door in a huge tourism company with 2 different animal parks (Sea World and Paradise Country), so I was a really happy bunny!

As the job was casual, I searched for a day job with a guaranteed income. I replied to an add looking for a home school teacher 3 days a week (perfect!) and this is where I met the wonderful Milly and her family. Milly is 11 and wasn’t getting on too well in school, so mum wanted someone to go back over year 5 with her, focusing the work on her specific interests and needs. Much to my delight, Milly loves animals, so this is where the topic ‘Let’s Build a Zoo!’ was born! I worked really hard in planning a topic where Zoos and animal education were involved in as many usual school subjects as possible, linking closely to the year 5 Australian Curriculum. (http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/Content_for_Year_5_-_Learning_area_content_descriptions.pdf)
I was really proud of the outcome, Milly did some fantastic work and we both really enjoyed the topic. Therefore I thought I would share it with you all on here in case anyone would like to use this topic, or any of the individual lessons in their teaching!

Literacy
In literacy we firstly looked at the non-fiction topic of information texts. Milly’s overall task was to create a sign for an animal enclosure in her zoo.
To become familiar with information texts we looked at many animal fact books, aimed at different audiences, to look at common features. We then looked in more detail at how to use these features in the text. E.g. Captions, titles, sub headings, bullet points etc. To help Milly picture what an animal enclosure sign in particular might need to include, we took a trip to Sea World to have a look! Milly took pictures of the enclosure signs she liked and pointed out all the text features we had been studying.
Back in the classroom Milly chose her animal to create a sign about, stingrays, and then carried out lots of research, both in books and online. After creating a plan together she independently created her information sign. This was the finished result, I know I’d like to see that hanging up in a zoo!!
13351099_10209760825716908_1821011777_o

The second literacy text was persuasive writing. Again we looked at all the features of a persuasive writing text, and learnt them in detail. Together we planned and practiced writing a persuasive writing piece. Her independent work for this text study was to write a piece either for or against zoos, she chose to write for zoos (phew!). Together we researched many arguments as to why a zoo is good and important. Milly was then able to independently plan and write an effective piece of persuasive writing.

Maths
There were so many year 5 study areas that we were able to cover in a zoo topic! First of all we looked at graphs, this would link to our scientific study (see science).
Secondly we studied area and perimeter. By doing this we were able to map out the size of our zoo, the size of the different animal enclosures, and then how to best fit those enclosures into our zoo.
Lastly, and Milly’s personal favourite study, was money. We looked at the financial costs of running a zoo. We worked out how many enclosures, staff and facilities our zoo could have with a given budget. We decided on pricings for entry, gifts and food based on our visit to Sea World and finally how many people would need to visit the zoo a day to be able to make a profit.

Science
When I first arrived, Milly had just gotten a new kitten, so I spotted a brilliant investigation opportunity. We planned a scientific investigation to measure the  kittens growth and then measured his weight and length for the next 8 weeks (the kitten was often not best pleased with our project!). We then plotted our results on a graph and concluded what we had discovered. We then also discussed how this could inform us when raising cubs of big cats in our zoo.
During this time we also looked at animal adaptations. As well as discussing different adaptations we also carried out experiments to help Milly physically see the benefit of the adaptation. My favourite being; 1.putting your hand in oil in an ice bucket to demonstrate the effectiveness of blubber. 2. making giraffe spit out of corn starch and water, to demonstrate how they are able to eat leaves off of spiky trees! We also touched on evolution and natural selection, but this is an incredibly hard topic for adults to grasp, let alone 11 year olds!

Art
Again this study was inspired by our trip to Sea World. Milly was fascinated by the little penguins, so we decided to design an enclosure! Milly researched, in great detail, what little penguins need to survive, and what other little penguin enclosures look like. I then helped her with a design and she got making. I could not have been more pleased with the outcome! We even got the approval of some little penguin zookeepers!!
13351247_10209760827756959_636336945_o

Geography
After a reminder on what a continent is and where places are on a world map, we researched using books, the internet, and documentaries, animals from Europe and North America (these are the two continents recommended for study in the curriculum). Milly then made a lovely fact file about the animals she had learnt about.

Milly then noticed that a threat common to a lot of these animals was direct or indirect poisoning. Therefore, using her information and persuasive text knowledge, made a poster to inform people about the dangers of animal poisoning.
13383902_10209760826196920_1229031308_o

I really have loved my time teaching Milly, and I am proud of how successful this topic has been. She has really enjoyed it and has come on in leaps and bounds. Obviously this was just a snapshot of the work, so if you would like any more detail or copies of planning please feel free to ask! As always please feel free to share to anyone you think may find this useful.

Our following topic was dinosaurs (also super fun!) so to finish, here is a picture of us on my last day, sporting some pretty scary masks!!
Speak soon, lots of love 🙂 x
13383705_10209760827836961_1819189991_o

 

 

3

Environmental Education, Aussie Style!

WP_20150910_10_49_28_Pro

So our exciting Australian adventure has been ongoing for 2 1/2 months now and we have just started our second year visa work on a farm an hour west of Gympie, QLD. I am nannying for a 4 & 2 year old which is turning out to be a challenging and testing experience that I will admit I was certainly not prepared for. But that’s not what this blog is about so I won’t bore you with my issues of adjusting to Aussie farm life. What I will tell you about is the fantastic opportunity I had last week whilst the children I am looking after were away.

The children had gone away for a week and I was really struggling to find worthwhile activities to fill my time, especially as this week was not paid or counting towards my second year visa. I tried the school to offer volunteering but due to not having a working with children (blue) card I was unable to go in for the week. Luckily on my drive into town one day I noticed a sign for an environmental education school around 40Km away (a short drive in Australian terms!). So I rang up the school, explained who I was and my situation and they were happy to take me on for a day to experience their school!

After conquering the bumpy dirt road in our old school 1984 caravan I arrived at a little school set deep in thick forest. I was greeted by the lovely Sue Gibson who instantly made me feel welcome to the school. I could tell that this was safe, familiar and comforting territory for me…something I had been seriously craving! Sue explained to me that they had a full day of activities running all about traditional Aboriginal Australia, with a large group of year 5s from Bundaberg.
First I was taken down to where a group of children were shelter building, a lovely familiar activity for me to start with. The children were busy with their wonderful looking wooden tipis, so I took the opportunity to chat to the environmental ed teacher and the teacher from the Bundaberg school. Both were great to chat to and it was nice to hear about their experiences and opinions of environmental and general Australian education. I then got stuck in with the children! All were more than happy to explain to me how their shelters were built and I sat with a group discussing the best and safest way for a fire pit to be made. Once the groups were finished the environmental education teacher invited the children to ask each other questions about their shelters and to explain their techniques. Again it was comforting to see familiar teaching methods that one would instinctively use in a similar way back home. Finally the teacher tested the shelters for durability (giving them a good kick) and waterproofing, giving each team a score out of 10. A healthy bit of competition.

WP_20150910_09_42_13_Pro

This was followed by morning tea where the teachers were kind enough to let me try some of the fantastic bush tucker (all the better as i’d forgotten my lunch!). This included wonderful new tastes such as wottle seed damper bread, sunset lime marmalade, bunya nut, macadamia nut & lemon myrtle tea.
Next was weaponry! Here the children were able use spears to catch bush turkeys, kangaroos and wallabies…don’t worry these little critters were made out of cardboard! What I thought was really great about this was the teacher explaining to the children about how the aboriginals would have hunted because they needed to, else they would have nothing to eat. This then lead to a discussion about where our meat comes from and how this is just a modern day version of hunting for food. After the children had all had a go at throwing a boomerang it was my go, and I’m ashamed to say that all of the children did better than me!

WP_20150910_11_11_01_Pro

After lunch the children were shown a range of aboriginal artifacts and were able to discuss and present in partners what the different artifacts were, who used them and what they were used for. The most interesting for me was a stone which was used as an axe that was found nearby the school, even though the stone it was made from does not originate anywhere near this area. This is incredible as it shows that either the aboriginal people would have had to travel thousands of kilometers to reach where the rock was left, or that they would swap and trade objects with other tribes. Fascinating!

WP_20150910_12_54_11_Pro

Then the last exciting part of my day (the children still had a couple further activities) was a walk through the forest identifying trees. Not did this activity clearly make use of the children’s observational skills but also got them to realise how different all of the trees really are! Although not directly linked to the traditional theme, I believe this was my favourite activity of the day. This was also when I saw my first snake! We were walking along and one of the children spotted something in the grass coming towards us, unfortunately it was long, slithery and black with a red belly! At first I was excited but then suddenly aware that I had 6 children with me! We just moved slowly forward and luckily the beautiful creature just crossed the path right in front of us! Truly exciting.

I am so appreciative of the Barambah Environmental Education Centre and Bundaberg school for letting me share a day with them. It reminded me of the job I really loved and restored some of the motivation to try and stay in the environmental education industry. I learnt a lot and enjoyed talking to all the children and staff. To top it all off there were a few wallabies and kangaroos out to say hello on my way home! A truly lovely day.

Unfortunately the next day I was quickly brought back down to earth when the children came home and I was reminded of what I am actually supposed to be doing here. But the 3 months here gives me time to apply for my teaching registration in Australia so that once we are finished and have done some more traveling I can begin applying for teaching positions. I have come up with some lovely animal and nature related activities to do with the children, so if they are interested in these at some point, I will upload pictures and let you know how they go!

G’day for now 🙂 x